Signs Mild Stroke

Signs Mild Stroke

signs mild stroke
Facial numbness, and slurred speech are two signs of a mild or more severe stroke.

It is important to know and understand the signs mild stroke. By doing so, you can recognize their meaning, and seek help either for yourself, or for someone you are with, which can help dramatically reduce the chances of it become serious and debilitating.

If you believe that you, or someone you are with is having a stroke of any severity, call 911.

I will explain what a mild stroke is. I will describe the early warning signs prior to having a mild stroke. I will also describe the symptoms of a mild stroke during the mild stroke, and why it is so important to seek medical help immediately.

I will also explain the current medical treatments for mild stroke. In addition, I will tell you about mild stroke preventative measures, both medical, as well as natural.

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What is a mild stroke?

A mild stroke is also known as a mini stroke, a tia, or a transient ischemic attack. A mild stroke is defined as a temporary stoppage or interruption of the flow of blood that carries oxygen and nutrients to a certain part of the brain, the spinal chord, or the eye that causes certain symptoms.

Normally the duration of one of these mini stroke episodes is 10 to 15 minutes, but can last as long as 60 minutes. When the blood flow returns after this period, the symptoms go away, and there is no permanent injury. This can be determined by an MRI or other brain imaging scans.

Although not as serious as a potentially disabling full blown stroke, these events should be treated as a medical emergency. As many as 10% of those that experiences these mild strokes will also have a full blown stroke often within days, if left untreated.

Depending on what area of the brain or spinal chord that is deprived of blood flow and injured, and what in the body that area of the brain controls will determine the symptoms of the mild stroke.

The signs that you may be having a mild stroke are troubles with speech such as slurring, confusion, lack of comprehension, vision problems, difficulty moving the body from one side or the other, and/or a weakness or deficit in one side of the body or the other.

You may experience a numbness and inability to use your arm muscles, or numbness in your facial muscles. Sometimes there are no symptoms at all.

If you are with someone that is having a mild or more severe stroke, after you call 911, have them lie down on their back, on the floor or on a sofa or bed, and put a pillow under their head and shoulders and upper back.

This will keep the airway open by keeping the head from coming too far forward. If you have any questions, the medical emergency dispatcher can assist you with the patient until the EMT’s arrive.

What causes mild strokes?

Mild ischemic strokes are often caused by a blockage in the carotid artery on the side of the neck or in blood vessels elsewhere leading to or in the brain. These blockages are made up of atherosclerotic or plaque build up on the walls of the arteries.

These build ups consist of saturated fats, cholesterol, and other substances. These blockages are attributed to a high fat diet, lack of exercise, smoking, lack of sleep, and/or other factors.

Other causes include cardiac abnormalities such as an abnormal heart rythym, or other sturctural abnormalities that may predispose the heart to produce clots that can travel to the brain.

In addition, damage to the neck and head, and genetic disorders such as a clotting disorder, or an abnormal formation of blood vessels can be a cause.

Signs mild stroke
Migraine headaches can be a precursor to mild or more severe strokes.

Stroke warning signs

Your body will provide warning signs prior to the onset of a mild or more severe stroke. These signs can appear around a month or more before.

These signs are: lightheadedness or weakness, headaches or migraines, fatigue, hiccups, unconsciousness, hallucinations, pain, problems breathing, sickness, personality changes, and epileptic episodes.

Current medical treatments

The current medical treatments for those having ischemic strokes, is a clot busting drug called TPA, that dissolves the clot or obstruction in the blood vessel. Other drug treatments include anti-coagulant, and anti-platelet drugs.

Another treatment is a catheter that is run from the inside of the upper thigh or groin all the way up into the blocked artery. if it is determined that the stroke has an obstruction in the brain, that literally grabs the obstruction and pulls it out.

Time is of the essense for both of these treatments. The drug must be given within 4 1/2 hours of the symptoms beginning, and the procedure must be done within 6 to 8 hours of the symptoms starting. In some cases the procedure can be given up to 24 hours after symptoms begin to manifest, depending on the patient.

If the drug TPA is given to the patient after the initial 4 1/2 hour window, it can make other treatments more difficult, and the drug may lose it’s effectiveness.

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Can mild strokes be prevented?

The prevention of mild strokes involve primarily the controlling or eliminating the risk factors that cause atheroscleroris or plaque build up.

Atherosclerosis or plaque build up consists of fats, cholesterol, and other substances that build up on the walls of the arteries. These risk factors are obesity, smoking, high blood pressure or hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia.

Other risk factors include previous mild strokes, cardiovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, and other heart, and cardiovascular issues.  Preventative measures include blood thinning, and anti-coagulating drugs.

In addition, stents which are plastic or metal tubes or cylinders placed within an artery in order to keep it open permanently are utilized in some instances to provide prevention in patients that have already had a stroke, or are considered a likely candidate for one to occur.

Signs mild stroke
Eating fresh, raw, organic fruits and vegetables can dramatically lower your risk of mild and more severe stroke.

Natural mild stroke prevention

Natural preventative measures include adding potassium, magnesium, vitamin C, and vitamin B to the diet, or through supplementation.

Organic, raw, unprocessed, unrefined, no additives, no preservatives, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, and whole grains are the dietary basics to provide all of the nutrients needed to help prevent mild strokes, as well as prevent many other conditions, and diseases.

This also means lowering or eliminating your intake of red meats, and fried foods which contain saturated fats that can clog arteries.

Exercise, meditation, and relaxation can also help to prevent mild strokes.

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Specifically the best foods and herbs to help prevent tia’s or mini strokes are:

Caution: Always check with your medical doctor before attempting any self treatments or remedies, especially if you are already under a doctor’s care for this condition.

Salmon  The anti-inflammation fighting Omega 3 fatty acids in fish like salmon can help lower your risk of mild stroke significantly by reducing inflammation in the arteries. Salmon will help improve blood flow, and lower the chance of developing clots and obstructions.

Bananas  The potassium content found in bananas can decrease the likelihood of mild strokes as much as 38%.

Almonds  Almonds have the ability to raise your HDL or good cholesterol, and lower your LDL or bad cholesterol. In addition almonds are loaded with vitamin E which can help keep plaque from building up on your artery walls.

Blueberries  These anti-oxidant packed powerhouses help widen your arteries increasing blood flow, and simultaneously reduce inflammation.

Oatmeal  Oatmeal is effective in lowering your LDL or bad cholesterol due to it’s content of soluble fiber.  In so doing, it prevents plaque build up in your arteries and blood vessels in the area of your brain.

Sweet Potatoes or Yams Another potassium rich vegetable will help lower your mild stroke risk.

Ginger  Ginger helps by lowering cholesterol, and improving cardiovascular circulation, inhibits blood clotting, and strengthens the heart.

Garlic this amazing herb can help lower blood pressure, defend against blood clots, lowers cholesterol and triglycerides,

Gingko Biloba  this versatile herb can increase blood flow to the brain, helps prevent blood clots, strenghtens capillaries, and also inhibits the formation of free radicals. A good preventative, and is also used to treat stroke related problems.

Turmeric also know as Curcumin, this multi faceted spice can help regenerate brain cells, and inhibit the formation of blood clots.

Turmeric can also thin the blood, relax and widen the blood vessels which may help lower your blood pressure, and can lower your cholesterol.

Other potassium rich foods that will also help lower your blood pressure, one of the risk factors for mild strokes, include watermelon, dates, oranges, apricots, pomegranates, cucumbers, peas, mushrooms, and broccoli.

Potassium rich herbs are:  hawthorn berry, celery seed, cinnamon, flax seed, cats claw, cardamon, and basil.

Signs Mild Stroke

Signs mild stroke
Knowing the warning signs of mild stroke can prevent a debilitating life or even death.

It is important to know and recognize the signs of a mild stroke. Doing so, can help save your life, and the life of others. and the quality of your life and others.

A mild stroke is also known as a mini stroke, a tia, or a transient ischemic attack. A mild stroke is defined as a temporary stoppage or interruption of the flow of blood that carries oxygen and nutrients to a certain part of the brain, the spinal chord, or the eye that causes certain symptoms.

The duration of these episodes is normally 10-15 minutes, but can last as long as an hour.  A mild stroke is verified by an MRI or other brain scan.

Pre stroke warning signs include:
lightheadedness or weakness, headaches or migraines, fatigue, hiccups, unconsiousness, hallucinations, pain, problems breathing, sickness, personality changes, and epileptic episodes.

The signs that you may be having a mild stroke are troubles with speech such as slurring, confusion, lack of comprehension, vision problems, difficulty moving the body from one side or the other, and/or a weakness or deficit in one side of the body or the other.

You may experience a numbness and inability to use your arm muscles, or numbness in your facial muscles. Sometimes there are no symptoms at all.

Stroke risk factors are obesity, smoking, high blood pressure or hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Other risk factors include previous mild strokes, cardiovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, and other heart, and cardiovascular issues.

Current medical treatments are clot busting drugs, and a catheter to remove the obstruction that is causing the problem.

Mild stroke prevention include eliminating or reducing the risk factors, and my implementing natural measures. These measures include a healthy diet, Exercise, relaxation, and meditation can also help.  The best preventative foods include, salmon, bananas, and ginger among others.

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Feel free to leave your comments, questions, or suggestions below. Also, feel free to like and share this article, Signs Mild Stroke on your favorite social media platform. Thanks for reading, Tom

8 thoughts on “Signs Mild Stroke”

  1. This is an incredibly important post. When you are having a mild stroke, or a loved one is, it can seem anything but mild, but it is critical that it be recognized early, as you rightly point out, and that medical professionals be called in as soon as possible.

    And of course, preventing one in the first place would be preferable. There are some food on your list I had not considered before, such as ginger. I like ginger but don’t consume it regularly as I do most of the other items. That’s something I’ll need to attend to, I think.

    Thanks, nicely done.

  2. Stroke can definitely be attributed to lifestyle, that’s for sure. It’s something I’ve also seen in many, which is the fact that those who haven’t lived such a healthy lifestyle are the most prone to strokes.

    My recommendation, always, is to incorporate healthy measures into your lifestyle. Start with solid exercise and please, pay attention to diet as well. It all begins with a solid foundation and if one has a family history of strokes, it’s even more important.

    1. Hi Todd, thank you for your comments. Yes, stroke and many other health issues can be prevented, or at least risks reduced, if we eat correctly. Tom

  3. My aunt just suffered a mild stroke. I have been learning a lot about strokes lately, and the symptoms to look for. I didn’t know that migraine headaches are a symptom, but now that makes more sense to me. A lot of what you have written about makes so much more sense to me now. Dizziness, lightheadedness, were among the things she was complaining about prior to the stroke. Your article strikes me not only about strokes but about eating healthy food including raw vegetables. It never ceases to amaze me how many health problems can be avoided by eating healthy. Thanks for sharing all of this wonderful information, I really appreciate it.

    1. Hi Steve, thank you for your comments, and compliment. I am glad that the information is useful for you. That is how it is intended. Take care, Tom

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